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MAAP Online Reporting Tool

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Copyright © The Ontario Aggregate Resources Corporation :: Page Updated 12-Sept-2018 :: Terms of Use :: Privacy Policy :: Program created by Greycoat Software Inc.

MAAP Online Reporting Tool - Terms of Use

Welcome to the MAAP Online Reporting Tool. This application will allow for easy access to geographic information and statuses on legacy pits and quarries across the province while maintaining landowner privacy.

One of the main purposes of the Trust is the rehabilitation of former pits and quarries deemed to be "abandoned". By definition, abandoned or legacy pits and quarries are those sites that have never been licenced following the establishment of the Aggregate Resources Act (the ARA) in 1990. These former extraction sites remain the property of individuals, corporate entities and municipalities. Typically, legacy sites are relatively small by nature (less than 2 hectares), were created as the result of small scale operations (municipal wayside pits, private use pits or intermittent commercial operations) and were generally unregulated.

For more information, please visit the Frequently Asked Questions section.

TERMS OF USE:

PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF USE CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS SITE

Acceptance

This website was created by The Ontario Aggregate Resources Corporation (TOARC). Use of this site and any of the data, text, maps and other information on the site (collectively "content") is governed by the terms and conditions set out below ("Terms of Use"). Use of the site implies acceptance of these terms.

Disclaimers

The site and its content are made available by TOARC as a public service without warranties of any kind, express or implied. Use of this site and any of its content is at the user's sole risk. In no event shall TOARC be liable to users or others in any way for any loss, damage or injury, regardless of cause, arising from access to, use of, or reliance on this site or any of the content.

TOARC makes no representation or warranty of any kind regarding the site or the content, expressed or implied, including but not limited to any representation or warranty that: (i) the content is current, accurate, complete, suitable for a particular purpose or reliable; (ii) the site or the content will be secure or available without interruption, error or omission; (iii) errors or omissions on the site or in any of the content will be corrected; (iv) any of the content will be transmitted to users; or (v) the site, related servers or the content are free of viruses or other harmful elements. The content is subject to change without notice.

Copyright

The content may be used and reproduced only in accordance with applicable intellectual property laws. Non-commercial use of non-substantial excerpts from the content is permitted provided that appropriate credit is given and TOARC copyright is acknowledged.

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Applicable Law

These Terms of Use are governed by the laws of the Province of Ontario. Users irrevocably consent to the exclusive jurisdiction and venue of the courts in the province of Ontario in any action or proceeding arising out of or relating to access to the site and use of any of the content and these Terms of Use. TOARC reserves the right to change these Terms of Use at any time at its discretion without notice.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of MAAP Online Reporting Tool (MORT)?

MAAP Online Reporting Tool was created to provide the public with self-service access to information on legacy pits and quarries while respecting the right to privacy of the individual landowners. The MAAP program is utilizing MORT as a means of sharing the status of the legacy sites across the province, showcase the naturalization of many legacy sites and highlight excellent rehabilitation that has been completed while maintaining landowner confidentiality.

What are the features of MORT?

MORT will help interested parties to:
  • Examine the status of legacy pit rehabilitation across the province.
  • Assess the number and status of legacy sites in Ontario and in individual counties and townships.
  • View individual site photos of closed legacy sites in each county and township.

What are Legacy Pits?

One of the primary functions of the Trust is the rehabilitation of former pits and quarries deemed to be "abandoned". By definition, abandoned or legacy pits and quarries include those that have never been licenced following the establishment of the Aggregate Resources Act (the ARA) in 1990. These former extraction sites remain the property of individuals, corporate entities and municipalities. Typically, they are relatively small by nature (less than 2 hectares), were created as the result of small scale operations (municipal wayside pits, private use pits or intermittent commercial operations) and were generally unregulated.

Where did the inventory of the legacy sites come from?

When the Aggregate Resources Act was created in 1990, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) undertook an inventory of site disturbances that were thought to be the result of aggregate extraction. That investigation resulted in the creation of approximately 6,600 legacy files. The inventory of sites first undertaken by the MNRF has been expanded to incorporate other areas of the Province as they become designated under the ARA; most notably new areas in northern Ontario. A history of these more recently designated areas can be found under the Designated Areas section. The most recent designation of 2007 resulted in 1,300 additional properties deemed to be abandoned and therefore eligible for assistance through the MAAP program.

Where can I get more information about a specific legacy pit or quarry?

Most legacy pits and quarries occur on private lands. As a result information on individual sites can only be released to the current landowner.

What is meant by 'Closed Files'?

Legacy files are 'closed' if upon a primary or re-evaluation the sites fall under one of more of the 'closed' classifications. Since it has now been over 20 years since sites in the original inventory were assessed and many of the legacy sites have not seen any disturbance for much longer than that (40 years and more in many cases). The reality is that many sites have reverted to other uses for a number of reasons. The extent to which older sites have reverted to other uses has been the subject of an ongoing systematic re-evaluation of the files contained in the original inventory.

What are the 'closed classifications' for Files?

Naturalized:

The MAAP program uses the term 'naturalized' for sites where ecological succession has increased in complexity until it has become stable or self – maintaining as a healthy, functioning ecosystem. Site checks must reveal that there are no safety concerns associated with the sites, that ecological niches exist, rehabilitation would do more harm than good and that the site blends in with the surrounding topography and landscapes. The MAAP program classifies naturalized sites into the following broad categories:

  • Forest
  • Forest Regenerating
  • Meadow
  • Non- Specified
  • Water Body
  • Wetland Complex
  • Alvar

MAAP Project:

The MAAP program rehabilitates pits and quarries every year, after rehabilitation the files are closed. The MAAP program aims to rehabilitate sites to provide a higher level of function (usefulness) over the prevailing condition of the site, always having regard to eliminating any safety concerns. Rehabilitation objectives are set in consultation with the landowner.

MNRF Project:

Between 1992 and 1996 the Ministry of Natural Resources completed the rehabilitation of legacy pits and quarries as mandated by the Aggregated Resources Act.

Rehabilitated by Landowner:

These are legacy pits and quarries that have been rehabilitated by the current or by the past landowner and no longer require the intervention of the MAAP program.

Developed:

These are legacy sites where the pit or quarry has been developed into commercial properties, residential homes or parklands.

Crown Land:

Legacy sites located on Crown land are closed since they are not designated under the Aggregate Resources Act. Subsequently, the legacy site would not qualify for the MAAP program.

Licenced:

In some instances legacy sites will have been licence under the Aggregate Resources Act. Subsequently, the legacy site no longer qualifies for the MAAP program as rehabilitation will now be a condition of the licence. Information on the pit or quarry can be found on the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forests Pits and Quarries Online database.

No Trace of Extraction:

Sites that fall into this classification are those where, after satellite image interpretation, ground truthing and landowner contact the location of the pit cannot be determined. The case may be that the legacy site may have been:

  • rehabilitated by a past landowner or;
  • a home or building may have been erected on the legacy pit/quarry location or;
  • there was not enough information in the original MNRF inventory to locate the site (ex. lot and/ or concession missing, no map provided, etc.) or;
  • the landowner reports that the disturbance was not caused by aggregate extraction.

What does Landowner Not Interested (LNI) mean?

Many landowners utilize the legacy site in its disturbed condition for a variety of functions (storage of farm implements, removal of gravel for personal use, and so on) and therefore are not interested in having the site rehabilitated by the MAAP program. Such sites are identified as "Land Owner Not Interested" but can be revisited if, the landowners change their minds or if the ownership changes hands and the new landowner is interested in the program.

What does it mean if a file is 'open'?

Open files are sites that potentially require intervention by the MAAP program to rehabilitate the legacy pit or quarry.

Are all open files equal?

No. The files are based on a priority ranking system of high, medium and low.

Given the size of the Province and the number and variety of sites to deal with, it has been necessary to establish certain priorities for organizing the MAAP work program, or open files. Site inventories are completed for the sites and provide a record of conditions, ranked with respect to a number of parameters that when totaled provide a composite ranking for each site. Things like possible safety concerns (unstable slopes, deep water, vertical cliffs, etc.), visibility, size, lack of vegetation and susceptibility to erosion are ranked on a simple scale that collectively provides an overall rating of high, medium or low priority. Those sites with the higher priorities are approached first when organizing the annual work schedule.

Definitions:

Crown Land:

Legacy sites located on Crown land are closed since they are not designated under the Aggregate Resources Act. Subsequently, the legacy site would not qualify for the MAAP program.

Developed:

These are legacy sites where the pit or quarry has been developed into commercial properties, residential homes or parklands.

Landowner Not Interested (LNI):

Many landowners utilize the legacy site in its disturbed condition for a variety of functions (storage of farm implements, removal of gravel for personal use, and so on) and therefore are not interested in having the site rehabilitated by the MAAP program. Such sites are identified as "Land Owner Not Interested" but can be revisited if, the landowners change their minds or if the ownership changes hands and the new landowner is interested in the program.

Licenced:

In some instances legacy sites will have been licence under the Aggregate Resources Act. Subsequently, the legacy site no longer qualifies for the MAAP program as rehabilitation will now be a condition of the licence. Information on the pit or quarry can be found on the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Pits and Quarries Online database.

MAAP Project:

The MAAP program rehabilitates pits and quarries every year, after rehabilitation the files are closed. The MAAP program aims to rehabilitate sites to provide a higher level of function (usefulness) over the prevailing condition of the site, always having regard to eliminating any safety concerns. Rehabilitation objectives are set in consultation with the landowner.

MNRF Project:

Between 1992 and 1996 the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry completed the rehabilitation of legacy pits and quarries as mandated by the Aggregated Resources Act.

Naturalized:

The MAAP program uses the term 'naturalized' for sites where ecological succession has increased in complexity until it has become stable or self – maintaining as a healthy, functioning ecosystem. Site checks must reveal that there are no safety concerns associated with the sites, that ecological niches exist, rehabilitation would do more harm than good and that the site blends in with the surrounding topography and landscapes. The MAAP program classifies naturalized sites into the following broad categories:

  • Forest
  • Forest Regenerating
  • Meadow
  • Non- Specified
  • Water Body
  • Wetland Complex
  • Alvar

No Trace of Extraction:

Sites that fall into this classification are those where, after satellite image interpretation, ground truthing and landowner contact the location of the pit cannot be determined. The case may be that the legacy site may have been:

  • rehabilitated by a past landowner or;
  • a home or building may have been erected on the legacy pit/quarry location or;
  • there was not enough information in the original MNRF inventory to locate the site (ex. lot and/ or concession missing, no map provided, etc.) or;
  • the landowner reports that the disturbance was not caused by aggregate extraction.

Rehabilitated by Landowner:

These are legacy pits and quarries that have been rehabilitated by the current or by the past landowner and no longer require the intervention of the MAAP program.